PICKUP EXPERT MARNI KINRYS TO GIVE PICKUP ADVICE FOR LIVE TWITTER Q&A EVENT

 

WHAT: Marni Kinrys will host a Twitter Q&A Live Event, taking questions and giving advice to frustrated single men and women in the delicate matters of attraction and the art of the pickup.

WHEN: Wednesday, November 20, 2013 – 5:30 pm to 6:30 pm (PST)

WHERE: https://twitter.com/winggirlmethod 

WHO: Marni Kinrys, an attraction/relationship coach, author, media personality, podcast host and the Ultimate Wing Girl. Kinrys has helped thousands of men – and now women – attract, meet and pick up anyone they choose.

ABOUT: The Twitter Q&A Live Event is a way for Kinrys to spend an hour delivering valuable free advice to help people with attraction and pickup. Users log on to Twitter, follow Marni at @winggirlmethod and join the conversation by typing in #AskMarni.

CONTACT: Brian Gross, BSG Public Relations, (818) 340-4422 – brian@bsgpr.com

About Marni Kinrys and The Wing Girl Method:

Marni Kinrys is an author, dating coach, host of the Podcast One’s Ask Women and the ultimate Wing Girl who guides men and women through the often painful process of meeting, attracting and connecting with their ideal partners through her empowering workshops, one-on-one coaching and straightforward self-help books, blogs and podcasts. Putting her Psychology degree (from Canada’s University of Western Ontario) to use, Marni began her career in 2004, creating her Wing Girl Method, specializing in the art of the pick-up, and publishing her first book, “The Playbook of What Women Want”.

The ‘World’s Best Female Pick-Up Artist’ (World PUA Summit, 2011) and ‘World’s Best Wing Girl (Global Pick-up Conference, 2010) has been featured in numerous media/news outlets, and is currently a contributing writer for Get the Five, Huffington Post and Sex.com. Marni’s Ask Women podcasts average 100,000 an episode and her most recent book “Get Inside Her: The Female Perspective” was an Amazon best-seller for six weeks. Best Dating Sites Inc. recently named her Sex.com vlog Best Dating Vlog of 2013 and her upcoming book “That’s Not How Men Work” is set for a 2014 release. Marni coaches clients in person or via Skype. For more information on Marni Kinrys go to: www.winggirlmethod.com.

Baci Lingerie Celebrates Successful Halloween Masquerade Event in NY


SoHo Retailers Entertained with Baci’s
Sexy Fashions at Invite-Only Event!
Baci Lingerie celebrated Halloween last night with a packed house at a private Halloween Masquerade Party in SoHo, New York. The party for local businesses, fashion retailers, media and was sponsored by Baci, Pep Real Estate, SohoNYC, Talent, McPeteSez, Hillary Flowers, and Mexican Radio, went from 6pm to midnight.

Many key Baci Lingerie personnel were in
 attendance, including Social Media Manager Veronica Rajadnya, who said, “Baci Lingerie is all about expressing yourself and having fun, so the Halloween Party and Fashion Show Spook-tacular was a wonderful opportunity to create brand awareness and meet buyers and media.”
The 2013 Halloween Masquerade Party was hosted by local fashion event organizer Hillary Flowers. Partygoers at the October 30 event enjoyed an interactive Baci Lingerie fashion show, where models showcased fifteen hand-selected ensembles. Baci’s Dreams Collection, as well as the new Corsets by Baci and Fetish by Baci lines, kept attendees visually stimulated all night. Baci’s exquisite handmade Italian Masquerade Masks, which feature Swarovski crystal embellishments, also added to the sexy high-end affair.

Rajadnya added, “Many of the pieces from our new 
corset and fetish collections were included in the fashion show; seeing them on the runway was a real treat. Attendees were really excited about the Baci Lash Bar; they were lining up all night! A great big thank you to Hillary Flowers and Jamie Gutierrez for putting it all together!”
 
Halloween partiers at the exclusive event were also treated to glamorous Baci Eyelashes, applied by skilled makeup artists. Baci Eyelashes were honored as Sensual Accessory Product/Line of the Year at the 2013 XBIZ Awards, further marking a phenomenal year for Baci. It was the second consecutive award for the product line, which offers users “Glamour in the Blink of an Eye.”
 
Baci Lingerie prides itself on the fine fabrics and flattering styles utilized in all its styles. Baci is designed to compliment every woman, enhancing her innate and unique sex appeal. The brand continues to evolve with new collections and designs, including its plus size collection, which encourages women of all shapes and sizes to embrace their sexy side. Baci is transitioning all styles in the Dreams Collection to include Diva (1X-2X) and Queen (3X-4X) sizing.
Baci Lingerie is available for retailers in the U.S. market through XGen Products. “Baci has a rich history of assisting retailers and we pledge to continue to do so, as we represent the brand.” For more information about Baci’s American sales, please contact sales@xgenproducts.com or call (877) 450-XGEN (9436).

The Models





































The Baci Lash Bar
           with Makeup Artists:
Angela Szpak & Priscilla Chakmakian

 





      The Party





















































About Baci Lingerie:
Baci Lingerie, which gets its name from the Italian word “kisses,” is the new name for exquisite, highly luxurious ladies’ lingerie. Officially presented to the public in 2010 at the Salon de International Lingerie in Paris, Baci made waves long before. Media headlines profiled the high-quality lingerie company for producing one of the most expensive and prestigious photo and video marketing shoots in the industry. Renowned fashion models, directed by a celebrated production team, present the initial 500 styles in beautiful photos and videos. Available through international partners around the world, Baci Lingerie is winning over consumers with its stunning styles. Featuring something for everyone and every occasion, Baci is the brand to wear, and the addition of plus sizes ensures Baci always “Celebrates Every Woman!” For more information, visit www.Baci.com.
For international sales information, please contact:
Sales@baci.com
For inquiries regarding New Business Development, please contact:
NBD@Baci.com
For international inquiries and information on becoming an exclusive Baci Lingerie distributor, contact:internationalinquiries@baci.com
For general Baci information, please contact: info@baci.com
818-783-6300
**Photography by NandovisionAldo Antonio,
Andrew (Ptbb AW), James H. Morris, Delfino Cortés,MomentoTempus PhotographyOrlando Benedicto Photography**
Interested in hosting your own fashion show in New York? Email fashionshow@mcpetesez.com 

via McPete Sez Newsletter.

Hanesbrands to Cut Half of Maidenforms Jobs


Hanesbrands Inc. said it will close the New Jersey headquarters of Maidenform Brands Inc. as part of a massive merger of the two apparel companies.
The Winston-Salem apparel manufacturer completed the largest purchase in its six-year history Oct. 7 by buying Maidenform for $585 million in cash. The deal was announced July 24.
As a result, close to half of Maidenform’s 1,330 global workforce will lose their jobs over the next 12 months.
The Maidenform operations in Iselin, N.J., will be consolidated into Hanesbrands’ local headquarters and in its Manhattan offices by the end of 2014.
Maidenform’s distribution center in Fayetteville will be closed by the end of 2014, with those operations being absorbed into Hanesbrands’ facilities in Forsyth and Cleveland counties.
The bulk of the retained Maidenform workforce, about 500 employees, is in its direct-to-consumer online, retail and outlet networks, Hanesbrands spokesman Matt Hall said. Maidenform’s distribution center in Ireland, with about 100 employees, will remain open, as well some sales, design and merchandising employees.
Hall said there will be minimal impact among Hanesbrands’ Forsyth County workforce, primarily involving sales. Local employees today will be given the same integration presentation as the Maidenform employees on Wednesday, Hall said.
Hanesbrands has about 2,500 employees in Forsyth County, including about 1,500 at its headquarters.
Hanesbrands said it has more than 130 vacancies at its Winston-Salem operations “that need to be filled in order to run the combined company.” Hall said those jobs would include sales, marketing, information technology, supply chain management and direct-to-consumer.
The company said filling the open positions is expected to add $13 million in annual pay and benefits to the Forsyth economy.
“We are pleased that Hanesbrands will be adding staff to its corporate headquarters in Winston-Salem,” said Gayle Anderson, president and chief executive of Winston-Salem Chamber of Commerce. “We look forward to meeting with the employees who are contemplating the move and telling them more about our area.”
The significant job cuts were not surprising given that Hanesbrands made the purchase mostly to gain access to Maidenform’s basic apparel brands and to wring cost savings from shifting Maidenform’s production from third-party vendors to Hanesbrands’ supply chain in Asia, Central America and the Caribbean.
“Reducing costs regarding Maidenform is obvious in shedding duplicate headquarter job functions,” said Peter Tourtellot, managing director of Anderson Bauman Tourtellot Vos & Co., a turnaround management company. “The other is less obvious in spreading more volume over the existing Hanesbrands distribution network by consolidating the Maidenform distribution.”
Maidenform has 300 headquarters jobs, of which three-fourths will be eliminated, Hall said.
Few of the 280 Fayetteville distribution center jobs will be retained once the facility closes, in large part because Hall said that Hanesbrands has existing capacity to absorb the work. Hanesbrands operates eight distribution centers in North Carolina with a combined 1,300 employees, not including seasonal temporary workers.
“There could be some upside in terms of jobs eventually,” Hall said.
Hanesbrands will provide severance and separation benefits consistent with Maidenform policies and collective bargaining obligations.
Hanesbrands expects the deal to contribute more than $500 million in incremental annual sales, 60 cents in diluted earnings for each share, $80 million of operating profit, and $65 million of free cash flow within three years.

via McPete Sez Lingerie Newsletter.

Companies Stand Against Forced Uzbek Labor


Cotton traders head to the Uzbek capital Tashkent for their annual cotton fair, as a growing number of international companies have declared their refusal to source cotton from the country until it ceases the forced labor of children and adults in its cotton fields.
The market value of companies that are signatories to the “Company Pledge Against Forced Child and Adult Labor in Uzbek Cotton” has surpassed $1 trillion, with 136 companies now part of the agreement, said the Responsible Sourcing Network (RSN).
By signing the cotton pledge, companies commit to not knowingly source Uzbek cotton until the practice of forced labor is stopped, said Patricia Jurewicz, director of RSN, a non-profit organization dedicated to bringing together investors, companies and human rights activists to create sustainable supply chains.
“The coalition of companies taking a stand against forced labor in the Uzbek cotton industry is growing,” Jurewicz said. “It’s a further step in stopping cotton that uses slave labor from entering the global market.”
Swedish furniture and housewares company IKEA, Canadian sportswear maker Lululemon Athletica, and British retailer Marks & Spencer are the latest additions to the pledge, which RSN launched in 2011, Jurewicz said.
Human Rights Watch said that for the 2012 harvest, the Uzbek government forced more than a million of its citizens – children and adults, including teachers, doctors, and nurses – to 
harvest cotton in abusive conditions under the threat of punishment. They are housed in cramped, unheated barracks and often do not have access to clean drinking water.
Uzbekistan – a landlocked, mainly Muslim country of 29 million in the heart of Central Asia – is ranked by rights bodies as one of the world’s most repressive states. The world’s 5th largest exporter of cotton, the country denies that children work in its cotton fields and remains silent about the existence of adult forced labor in its cotton industry, estimated to be worth $1 billion annually.
Jurewicz stressed that more needs to be done to enable companies to move from “not knowingly sourcing” to “knowing and not sourcing” Uzbek cotton.
Traceability is a crucial factor in ensuring supply chains are free from forced labor, but it is complex and expensive to trace everything in the supply chain “down to the dirt in the cotton fields”, she said.
Yarn spinners – the people or companies that take the raw materials and convert them into yarn or textile – are key players in achieving responsible sourcing because they are the ones who purchase cotton and receive shipments, so they know where the cotton is grown. A validation and certification system could help identify those who do not buy from countries that use forced labor, Jurewicz said.
“If you reward the yarn spinners for not buying from those who exploit the pickers, you could shift the market and help end the practice of forced labor,” she said.
She added that it is encouraging that the Uzbek government for the first time is allowing the International Labor Organization (ILO) to conduct an inspection during the ongoing 2013 harvest. But she said that ILO representatives were being accompanied by Uzbek officials, making it difficult for workers to speak openly. 
Cotton traders head to the Uzbek capital Tashkent for their annual cotton fair, as a growing number of international companies have declared their refusal to source cotton from the country until it ceases the forced labor of children and adults in its cotton fields.
The market value of companies that are signatories to the “Company Pledge Against Forced Child and Adult Labor in Uzbek Cotton” has surpassed $1 trillion, with 136 companies now part of the agreement, said the Responsible Sourcing Network (RSN).
By signing the cotton pledge, companies commit to not knowingly source Uzbek cotton until the practice of forced labor is stopped, said Patricia Jurewicz, director of RSN, a non-profit organization dedicated to bringing together investors, companies and human rights activists to create sustainable supply chains.
“The coalition of companies taking a stand against forced labor in the Uzbek cotton industry is growing,” Jurewicz said. “It’s a further step in stopping cotton that uses slave labor from entering the global market.”
Swedish furniture and housewares company IKEA, Canadian sportswear maker Lululemon Athletica, and British retailer Marks & Spencer are the latest additions to the pledge, which RSN launched in 2011, Jurewicz said.
Human Rights Watch said that for the 2012 harvest, the Uzbek government forced more than a million of its citizens – children and adults, including teachers, doctors, and nurses – to 
harvest cotton in abusive conditions under the threat of punishment. They are housed in cramped, unheated barracks and often do not have access to clean drinking water.
Uzbekistan – a landlocked, mainly Muslim country of 29 million in the heart of Central Asia – is ranked by rights bodies as one of the world’s most repressive states. The world’s 5th largest exporter of cotton, the country denies that children work in its cotton fields and remains silent about the existence of adult forced labor in its cotton industry, estimated to be worth $1 billion annually.
Jurewicz stressed that more needs to be done to enable companies to move from “not knowingly sourcing” to “knowing and not sourcing” Uzbek cotton.
Traceability is a crucial factor in ensuring supply chains are free from forced labor, but it is complex and expensive to trace everything in the supply chain “down to the dirt in the cotton fields”, she said.
Yarn spinners – the people or companies that take the raw materials and convert them into yarn or textile – are key players in achieving responsible sourcing because they are the ones who purchase cotton and receive shipments, so they know where the cotton is grown. A validation and certification system could help identify those who do not buy from countries that use forced labor, Jurewicz said.
“If you reward the yarn spinners for not buying from those who exploit the pickers, you could shift the market and help end the practice of forced labor,” she said.
She added that it is encouraging that the Uzbek government for the first time is allowing the International Labor Organization (ILO) to conduct an inspection during the ongoing 2013 harvest. But she said that ILO representatives were being accompanied by Uzbek officials, making it difficult for workers to speak openly. 

via McPete Sez Lingerie Newsletter.